Making Your Wi-Fi Network Run Faster

a wireless routerThe endless quest to eke a little more performance out of your network connection has definitely made the transition into today's home wi-fi networks. Unless you're extremely fortunate, you've probably got a few dead spots in your house where wi-fi reception is terrible, and even when you have a strong signal, you may experience slowdowns. Here are some great ideas for bringing your home network up to speed.

Improve Signal Reception

The solution to your wi-fi woes isn't necessarily buying a new router. It can help - especially if you're not using the latest Wireless N or Wireless AC hardware - but sometimes all you need is a few clever tweaks to your overall setup.

First of all, try to position your router as centrally as possible. Keep it away from any obstructions and other electronics, and try to elevate it as high as you can. Raising it high up can hep you to attract a better signal and catch the wi-fi reception more efficiently.

In a busy modern home, there may be loads of different wireless and electronic devices broadcasting EM radiation through the air. The most common communications channels tend to get backed up, and signal traffic jams can rob you of speed. Check your router's settings to see if you can switch frequency or channels.

Most home electronics operate at 2.4 GHz. If your router can operate at 5 GHz instead, it'll run into a lot less competing for traffic. Switching to a less-used frequency has a similar effect.

Set Up QoS On Your Router

QoS stands for "Quality of Service," and it means imposing intelligent rules on how your router distributes bandwidth. Your wi-fi network is stuffed with both active and passive internet links, many of which can be extreme bandwidth hogs. This is particularly the case for routers that are trying to serve a busy group home or a large family, but even smaller homes can run into bandwidth shortages.

Your router may come with integrated QoS options in its settings. Don't despair if you can't find QoS settings, though; installing a robust third-party firmware package (such as DD-WRT) can help. Once you have access to QoS options, you can prioritise your wireless bandwidth usage based on application, device, or IP address.

Make Sure Your Security Is Working

This is a relatively obvious solution to a particular cause of network slowdowns: Make sure your wi-fi network is password protected using WPA2 encryption. Even setting aside the risks of data or identity theft, running an open, unencrypted wi-fi network is an invitation to all and sundry to jump on board and use up the free bandwidth you're so generously providing.

It is fairly common that people don't encrypt their wi-fi network with a password if it if for home use. If your wi-fi network is left open, then it is very easy for someone in the neighbourhood to find your connection and jump on board. They can use your internet connection without you realising, which would slow down your connections speeds as there are more devices connected to your network.

a man in the cloud fixing a wireless network connectionMaking your wi-fi network faster is a complicated process, and the suggestions presented here are really just the tip of the iceberg. If you study the matter further, you'll find plenty of other options that may also be helpful.

If you need to speed up your network in your workplace, then these tips may also help. However, a business network can often be slightly more complicated, so contacting a local IT support firm would be a good step in the right direction. They will be able to assess your set-up and implement the necessary changes to get you the best possible speeds.